by Patrick Appel

NIAC tries to understand what Ahmadi is trying to say by appointing three women to his cabinet:

Although this is the first time in 30 years after the 1979 Revolution that Iranian women are allowed to serve as cabinet ministers, some female activists like Fatemeh Haghighatjou and Parvin Aradalan believe that this does not affect the fundamental situation women face in Iran.  According to them, the appointments are mainly a “tactic” by Ahmadinejad to soften the harsh language against him by the opposition side.

On the other hand, his choice of these three conservative nominees could simply signify Ahmadinejad’s desire to control the leadership of three important ministries that mainly cover and serve the middle class families in Iran who turned to become major Mousavi supports during and after 12 June election.

In other Iran news, the country has allowed International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors back for the first time in a year.

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