A reader writes:

Actually I don't think you could come up with a workable way to do what your reader describes. If you used IPs to determine your paywall they'd get spoofed. If you used usernames and passwords, you'd have an enormous headache on your hands (somehow I don't see ISP security guys relishing sharing logon information -- it would almost definitely be a second account).

There might be SOME people who are interested in getting a broadband connection that had some guaranteed content, but I doubt it would be a large number. The effect would be the same as the paywall over TimesSelect -- whatever is behind a paywall will not be part of the conversation online.

The business model of getting people to pay for news is dead.


People won't accept it now. If they wanted to do that they should have done it years ago. Now they have to deal with the business environment THEY created. The expectations of their customers are THEIR creation. To whine about it now is counterproductive and childish. I don't want to see print journalism die, but the CEOs and corporate leadership that allowed these companies to avoid adjusting in the 90s and early 2000s really need to feel some pain. So far they haven't - they've laid off the folks who did nothing but work hard to make the company go. It's a darn shame more of them haven't done the honorable thing and resigned.

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