Agblood

by Andrew

"[T]here was so much information in the public domain -- and so much information that would eventually be released -- that the attorney general could no longer argue that no specific instances of lawbreaking had been brought to his attention. When an OLC memo says "Don't ever do X," and a Red Cross report, backed up by independent witnesses and government cables, is explicit that "X" happened, Holder really had no choice. Some on the left have argued that President Obama risked the legitimacy of American judicial institutions by forgoing a broader investigation and by urging his attorney general not to look more deeply at past practices.  If the Attorney General didn't at least review past cases in the light of all available information, the administration could fairly be accused of refusing to accept the obvious. Lieberman should be satisfied that Holder has decided to limit the investigation to twelve documented instances of abuse, and that the White House's first reaction here was to worry about morale at the CIA," - Marc Ambinder.

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