by Chris Bodenner

Ackerman also worries, but makes some promising points:

[T]roops get all kinds of sympathy that CIA operatives never do, and therefore there's an expectation of moral virtue that [Lynndie] England, in the eyes of many, tacitly violated; by contrast, CIA operatives are expected to do bad things in our name that we'd rather not hear about. It's easier, in other words, to hang them out to dry. Furthermore, the CIA's interrogation program has been vouched for by George W. Bush personally, so the few-bad-apples argument is much harder for apologists to make, even if Interrogator Jim used 8 oz. of water to waterboard when the rules clearly told him to use 4 oz. or whatever. But we'll see.

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