by Patrick Appel

David Bernstein makes a strained argument:

Various articles, such as this one, accuse conservatives of "paranoia" for thinking that health care "reform" will lead, for example, to Trig Palin being denied medical care. I agree that it's a bit paranoid, but not nearly as irrational as the critics suggest. Eugenics enforced by government dictate once had strong support on the Progressive left, more recently than some might imagine....If liberals can understand the fallout from the Tuskegee experiment and how it has affected African-American trust of the government with regard to health care, they should be able to understand why religious conservatives--whose intellectual ancestors were the primary, and practically the only, opponents of eugenics during its heyday in the 1920s--might get overly paranoid when modern liberals talk about saving money on health care by making tough choices and so forth.

His post has more strawmen in it than all the cornfields of Iowa.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.