by Patrick Appel

Rod Dreher speaks up:

I was talking the other day to a friend who is really frightened of the healthcare bill, saying that he won't be able to get the care he's used to. I'm not sure how true that is, but what troubles me about critics of health care reform is the lack of concern from many of them about the uninsured. I have a good friend who just lost his job. He has a young son with a chronic health issue. COBRA is going to cost them $1,800 a month, for as long as it lasts. What if he can't find work before it runs out? What if the work he finds doesn't come with health insurance? By the grace of God and the generosity of my employer, I have good health insurance. But what if I lost my job tomorrow?
Look, I'm not saying that we should not be concerned about, and not oppose Obama's proposed healthcare reform, if it truly is a bad deal. But it's not enough to say, "Hey, it's going to mess with my healthcare, and I'm going to fight it tooth and nail." The situation we're in now is intolerable, and unsustainable, and we don't do the country any good by adopting the Democratic Party's line on Social Security -- namely, that any attempt to reform a broken system that would cost any current recipient anything is completely wicked and must be opposed.

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