A reader writes:

Just what was so improper about the Cambridge police's arrest of another Harvard professor three years ago? Unlike Professor Gates, who was arrested and released shortly thereafter, we can infer that this other Harvard professor was actually indicted, because we know that he was later actually put on trial for assault and battery, based upon charges brought by his ex-wife. In short, the police had probable cause to arrest him, regardless of whether he was in his house, your house, or the Harvard faculty lounge. Following his arrest, his case was overseen by prosecutors, not the police, because that's how the criminal justice system works.

Whether or not he was guilty of the charges was for a jury to decide -- again not the police. The jury ruled in his favor, and on that basis he is a free man. But that doesn't mean he never should have been arrested in the first place. All that was required was credible information that he might have been guilty, and if that bar is met, the criminal justice system takes it from there. The police don't render the ultimate verdict; that's not their job. So why do you continue your unrelenting assault on the police, who were just doing their job?

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