by Chris Bodenner

Michele Humes spots a trend:

Suddenly, at least in the West's more rarefied culinary environs, meat has become dessert. In Paris, Pierre Hermé's extensive macaron selection includes a chocolate-and-foie-gras flavor, shimmering with gold leaf. At Chicago's Grocery Bistro, chef Andre Christopher tops a seared lobe of foie gras with shards of Heath bar. And out of her tiny boutique in New York City, Roni-Sue Kave sells handmade "pig candy": whole strips of deep-fried bacon coated in dark or milk chocolate.

Humes also traces the fascinating history of a Turkish dessert called tavuk göğsü - a kind of milk pudding with shredded chicken. (I'll stick with the chocolate bacon.)

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