That was the size of the majority as the American Psychological Society Association voted to condemn so-called "reparative therapy" to turn gays into straights. This is not a new position, but the statement is strong and the vote overwhelming. Since this therapy is central to the Christianist claim that gay rights are invalid because gayness is a choice, the views of the experts matter. But not, of course, to Christianists. Money quote:

“Both sides have to educate themselves better," Ms. Glassgold said. “The religious psychotherapists have to open up their eyes to the potential positive aspects of being gay or lesbian. Secular therapists have to recognize that some people will choose their faith over their sexuality.”


That seems totally right to me. Pressuring anyone into anything is not the role of psychologists. And pressuring anyone to be gay should be anathema as well. The point of the gay rights movement is not to encourage people to be gay. It is to enlarge the scope of freedom so that more people, gay and straight and bi and trans, can be themselves. With dignity and respect.

I wrote a long and detailed essay on reparative therapy, Freud, and homosexuality in Love Undetectable, the book I'm proudest of. It's the second chapter: Virtually Abnormal. I defend Freud from his successors and offend a few gay absolutists at the same time.

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