A reader responds to this post on subsiding blog traffic:

I think what we're dealing with is actually an affordance of the book that was previously hidden by the overwhelming paper-ness of it: books are discrete organizations of complex thought, invented and used by a species that is naturally good at building such discrete organizations. It strikes me that a lot of bloggers, myself included, start blogs because we have an idea that would twenty years ago have only been expressible as a book, or perhaps a never-to-be-published manuscript. Mine took more than a year to get fully out there, but now what I do when I blog is more or less to provide notes toward a hypothetical second edition.

Doing what you do--what I guess we could call "true blogging"--seems to me not to be something many humans are suited for, whereas I think there are many more of us who are suited for the "blook" paradigm. It stands to reason that if the above is the case, we're hitting a point where a lot of previously pent-up blooks, whether they're so called or not, have been written, and the pace will become slower, but still, I tend to think, steady.

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