by Chris Bodenner

Ta-Nehisi thinks No Drama appeared especially "perturbed" by the Gates incident:

[F]or black people, this is the kind of issue that tends to cut across lines of class and politics. I would say that this is the sort of thing that angers upper middle-class black people even more than it angers anyone else, because they tend to be individuals who, by society's lights, are very accomplished. They deeply resent being lumped in with the mass. And more than anyone they resent the whole "when you're black, you talk to the police like this" routine. Obama has lived as a member of that class for a large portion of his adult life, or he's had some concentrated exposure to it--the black strivers roll deep on the South Side. It's not shocking that he was pissed.

TNC has further thoughts on the Gates incident worth reading:

It needs to be said that, though I casually threw it out there, I really have no clue whether race played a role in Gates' arrest. It's important to say that. I don't know what I would have done if I were in shoes, but I don't know that I'd assumed race. I think the decision to arrest a guy for, at worst, being rude in his own house is shockingly stupid. The thought of someone like that carrying the power of life and death is mind-boggling.

That said, the wind is leaving my sails over this one and I'm not sure why. I keep getting this "doth protest too much" vibe every time I read Gates's interviews. It's interesting that it took his own arrest for Gates to decide to make a doc about this. Maybe he's had a Come To Jesus moment. Who can know? Who can really know?

I'm much more concerned over Shem Walker's family. The dude was killed for doing what lot of would do if we saw some fool hanging out on our mother's porch. And the taxpayers will most certainly be held to account for it. I don't want people like that holstering guns around my kids.

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