A reader writes:

The Schwenkler challenge to your curiosity about the Palin pregnancy stories is the classic "straw man" argument - mischaracterize your opponent's position and then debate the mischaracterization.

Those who disbelieve Palin on her bizarre pregnancy story don't suggest that she concocted a phony motherhood of Trig in order to curry right-wing support by creating an image of herself as a 100% pure pro-lifer. The disbelievers -- I am one -- suggest that she was concealing the pregnancy of a daughter, a centuries-old practice.

My twist on the suspicion:

not only did Palin fake the whole broken-water, multi-leg, commercial flight, long-distance return to Wasilla, but Trig was not born on that same morning or even in that same month. Remember, if the Palins hide the birth certificate in order to conceal the identity of the mother, that also affords them the ability to conceal the date of birth. If you recall, the pregnancy of daughter Bristol that came to light during the campaign was raised by the Palins in order to refute the possibility that Trig could be Bristol's son, but the later pregnancy of Bristol only proves that she cannot be the mother of Trig if Trig were born at the conclusion of the spectacular -- and unlikely -- return from Texas.

And this, I suggest, is the reason for the fabricated story of what, if true, would have been the most reckless pregnancy on record. I feel a little unsavory discussing the birth circumstances of a baby, even moreso one with Down's Syndrome. And I hate to allege a birth certificate-related conspiracy at the same time that others -- with whom I would prefer not to be lumped -- allege that President Obama hasn't proved he was born in the United States. But I ask you, is Sarah Palin dishonest enough to concoct such a lie?

Of course she's crazy enough to concoct such a lie - especially when she was merely governor of Alaska. But I do not know if this is true, and it is unlikely, if possible. My only request is that someone ask her on the record or get some proof. That's all I've asked since last August: for reporters to do their jobs.

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