by Chris Bodenner

A.V. Club reviews Everything Is Terrible! The Movie:

Now drastically re-edited and spliced together, these leftovers from the VHS heyday tell one concise, hourlong story about an alien society preoccupied with sex, drugs, martial arts, spirituality, diet, and stranger-danger. Everything Is Terrible! The Movie extracts the essence of the late ’80s and early ’90s, when semi-celebrities would stare at people through their TV screens and offer direct instructions on how to lead a better life by following a few easy steps. Ultimately, those secrets were all the same: Viewers were encouraged to think of themselves as products, to be buffed-up and pitched to a world cleanly divided between the well-adjusted and the doped-up perverts. [...] It’s simultaneously enlightening, hilarious, and deeply sad.

The reviewer, Noel Murray, also links EIT to the greater mash-up movement:

Does Everything Is Terrible!’s repurposing of old footage really qualify as art? For that matter, is it ethical? For answers to those questions, turn to Brett Gaylor’s documentary Rip! A Remix Manifesto, which deals with the history and future of appropriation in popular culture. Gaylor tethers his argument to the music of Gregg Gillis (a.k.a. Girl Talk), whose songs cram together dozens of unlicensed samples into a frenzied, danceable sound-collage.

Last year I wrote a short essay for the Dish showing how Girl Talk is emblematic of the Millennial Generation. Read it here .

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