by Patrick Appel

Fear Of A Red Planet explains why it isn't replicable:

Firstly under the nationalists and now under the communists China hasbeen subject to the greatest and most successful program ofnation-building ever seen. Whilst in India there are reportedly stillwhole villages in which nobody has ever heard of the country ‘India’,since 1912 the Chinese nation has steadily been built up, with ethnicand regional loyalties largely subsumed into the Chinese identity orrace (中华民族).
Whilst it is generally believed in China that thisidentity has existed for thousands of years, it is in fact an inventionof nineteenth century theorists like Liang Qichao(梁啟超), intended to replace an imperial system fairly similar to the onethat existed in the Austro-Hungarian or Russian empires. This haslargely succeeded, and it is only in those areas with ethnic identitiesso entirely different to that of the majority as to be incompatible(such as Tibet and Xinjiang) that it has failed. The high level ofnationalism in China (Australian China-hand Ross Terrilldescribed it as “the nearest thing China has to a national religion”)has allowed the Chinese state to survive pressures which would shatterother countries, as such the Chinese model cannot simply betransplanted to countries with strong regional identities.

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