"Western countries face a difficult set of choices with Iran. Should they return to the negotiating arena with Iran? Wouldn't that mean simply glossing over the rigged election and accepting President Ahmadinejad as the head of its government? Yes, but it isn't clear what the alternative would be. The problem with Iran's nuclear program remains. And we're negotiating with them to see if some agreement can be reached. That program continues to grow. And refusing to negotiate will not do anything to stop it. And yet, it seems odd to act as if the extraordinary events of the past month simply didn't happen.

So, here's one solution: Do nothing.


The five major powers on the U.N. Security Council, plus Germany, have already given Iran a very generous offer to restart the nuclear negotiations. Iran has not responded. So, the ball is in Tehran's court. Until Iran responds, the West should simply sit tight, build support for tougher sanctions and more isolation, if necessary. It might seem like the West has bad options right now, but Iran has even fewer and worse ones. Its economy is doing very badly. The regime has faced its greatest challenge since its founding. Its proxies in Lebanon, Iraq and elsewhere are all faring worse than it had expected. And we now know the answer to a very big question: Are there moderates in Iran? Yes. Within Iran, there are millions of people, including very powerful members of the establishment, who favor a less confrontational approach to the world. Let the supreme leader and President Ahmadinejad stew a bit and figure out what they should do first. Time might not be on their side," - Fareed Zakaria, on the best show on cable news.

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