A reader makes a shrewd point about how the corruption of money has helped destroy conservatism - and how this also helps explain Palin's motives for quitting:

Conservatism is two things -- it's a political philosophy, and a cultural movement that's being mined for commercial purposes. Every wingnut's behavior seems crazy and unhinged if you look at it from a political context. But if you look at it from a commercial context, they're all being completely rational -- they all make lots and lots of money.

The problem with the movement is that the people at the top always go for the money. If Ann Coulter will bolster your ratings, you'll put her on, even if she diminishes your side's chances of winning elections.

I don't think that demonstrating that Palin is bad, or that the whack job on Glenn Beck is bad, will fix this thing. Because if they go down, some other demagogues will take their place.

Until conservatism the political philosophy renounces conservatism the demagogic industry, they're basically screwed. And the business folks are leaving a lot of lasting damage in their wake -- it's not politicians (for the most part) who rail against immigrants. It's talk radio hosts. They do it for money. Throwing chum in the water is profitable. But even if the GOP denounced these guys today, it would take a long time before a lot of people started to trust them again. Hispanics won't vote Republican for a long time. The demagogues say they're standing on principle, that they won't be silenced, that they will continue to speak the truth. But they just want the money.

So Todd and Sarah Plus Five (Or Four) is just a newer version of Jon and Kate Plus Eight. It's great box office for a cable channel; but as a philosophy for a political party? Rush Limbaugh sees the rationale here.

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