Matt Steinglass counters Megan over health care reform and obesity:

[T]his situation where people are saying they’re psychologically unable to act in what they identify as their own interests, Megan seems to be unwilling to reach into the social toolkit to help them out, because she can’t see reaching into the social toolkit as anything other than coercive. I’d bet that when she so much as reads the phrase “reach into the social toolkit,” she shudders, even when it refers to paving more bicycle lanes. So what does she think can be done?
I think she thinks that nothing can be done. “Nothing can be done” is not an appealing political program. It doesn’t even seem to me like an appealing way of being in the world. But, in large measure because a lot of congresspeople share these kinds of unexamined quasi-libertarian ideas about health care, it seems possible that nothing is exactly what will get done about health care in the US.

Follow-up here.

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