by Chris Bodenner

Eli Lake reports:

One of the world's largest engineering firms, Siemens, could lose hundreds of millions of dollars in sales to the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) because it sold Iran equipment used to spy on dissidents. [...T]he German company participated in a joint venture with Nokia in 2008 to sell Iran's telecommunications company a monitoring center that, according to the joint venture's own promotional literature, can intercept and catalog e-mails, telephone calls and Internet data.

Meanwhile, The Guardian reported last week that demand for Nokia handsets in Tehran fell by as much as half following calls for boycotting the company. Also, according to Tehran Bureau, advertising revenue for Iranian state TV has taken a big hit as well.

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