Daphne Eviataris spoke with an unnamed staffer of a Senate Judiciary Committee member about torture prosecutions:

“I don’t buy that they’re just going to go after the low level people. There’s at least a chance that if these investigations move forward, they’ll go up the chain. If it involved techniques that were authorized that are illegal, you’d go to the person who had command responsibility for that.”

Ackerman isn't impressed:

So... a station chief? A Counterterrorist Center official? If that's the thinking, there will be accountability for the Englands and the Graners. Justice!

Holder should start with Yoo and work his way up. My worry is that if he doesn't, his investigation of the extremes legitimizes the non-extreme torture and abuse; and integrates the precedent into American government and way of life. Torture, following Bush and Cheney's embraceof it as a moral necessity, has gained great new life around the world; and I'm sure, in the netherworld of America's prison system, Cheney methods are now quite popular.

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