Here's a money quote for you:

"If she has an eye on 2012, she probably will write a carefully worded, bland policy book that won't make headlines. If she's not running for president in 2012, she can write a much more candid book that's likely to get attention from both the press and the public. She can explain the real reason she resigned the governorship, and she can talk about how badly she was treated by specific people in the media and the John McCain campaign."


The real sell of the book will be the truth about the resignation, if she can keep it hushed up that long. Look: it feels far worse to be forced to resign than to resign in advance for inexplicable reasons. This way, she still feels in charge of the situation, and can leverage what she won't tell the press to lard up an explosive book. Then she becomes a super-celeb and joins the far right money-train. The question I'm asking is whether anyone else in a tiny group of people has already cashed in. But we can't know because we don't have a working press prepared to ask every possible question that needs to be asked.

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