by Chris Bodenner

In the wake of Rafsanjani's call to release demonstrators, Mousavi ratchets up the rhetoric:

"Who believes these people, many of them prominent figures, would work with the foreigners and to endanger their country's interests?" he was quoted as saying. "They should be immediately released."

Meanwhile, Khamenei clamps down:

"Anyone, no matter their rank or title, will be detested by the people if they lead our society towards insecurity," he said in a speech carried on state television. "Our leaders must be vigilant. Any word or action which helps [the enemies] will be contrary to the interests of our people."

So does Ahmadi:

Iran’s deputy interior minister, Ali Reza Afshar, announced that the president has demanded laws that would toughen prison conditions for “professional criminals, hooligans and thugs.” The deputy interior minister claimed that people have “welcomed” the armed forces “project to collect hooligans and thugs,” which “should continue and professional criminals must always feel unsafe.”

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