by Chris Bodenner

A reader writes:

If you're going to post that ad, you should probably give credit where it's due. Takeuchi Taijin's "A Wolf Loves Pork" is an even more delightful example of this kind of stop-motion animation, using the terrain as backdrop to individual photographs, and he's generally agreed as being the inventor of the technique. I don't discredit advertisers for stealing good ideas, but in the age of the Internet, it's nice that we can point back and say, "You got that from Taijin-san!"

The Dish posted "A Wolf Loves Pork" a few months back as a MHB; it's awesome. But I do think the Olympus ad took it  to a whole new level, especially the way it combined the movement of stop-motion with the idea of personal photos taken over the years. I think the ad is a good example of a company that not only recognizes the brilliance of art on the Internet but adapts it to its own product. Another reader, however, points to a more pressing concern:

From the commentary on the video it's pretty clear that he wasn't compensated for their appropriation of his idea.

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