Nico gets an email from NIAC's Patrick Disney:

I wanted to give you and your team a heads-up that we're hearing from a lot of sources that Thursday will likely see a lot of unrest and potential violence in Iran. It marks the 10th anniversary of the "18th of Tir", which is a monumental day in Iran.

On that day in 1999, students protesting the closing of the reformist newspaper "Salaam" were attacked in their dormitories in Tehran and Tabriz. Six days of protests ensued, which began with several hundred students and blossomed into thousands of people from all walks of life supporting the demonstrations. They were the biggest display of [protest] sentiment in the regime's then twenty-year history, and they were put down by the regime with a mandate by the threatened leadership to stop the unrest at any cost.

The parallels to today's events are uncanny, and while the date has been marked with numerous protests since 1999, this anniversary takes on a special significance. We know that authorities are already trying to lock the cities down ahead of time. Demonstrations are planned all over the U.S. in solidarity with the protesters letting them know the world is watching what the regime is doing.

NIAC also relays news that Mousavi, Karroubi, and Khatami met on Monday for the first time since the election. Could they be planning something for tomorrow?

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