by Patrick Appel

Vaughan points to a new study:

In this study, the participants (psychology students no less), were given a booklet explaining how cognitive biases work that described eight of the most common ones. They were then asked to rate how susceptible they were to each of the biases and then how susceptible the 'average American' was. Each rated themselves as less affected by biases than other people, instantly causing an irony loop in the fabric of space and time.

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