by Patrick Appel

Money quote:

In a type of mock ceremony that’s now been performed in at least four states, a robed “priest” used a hairdryer marked “reason” in an apparent bid to blow away the waters of baptism once and for all. Several dozen participants then fed on a “de-sacrament” (crackers with peanut butter) and received certificates assuring they had “freely renounced a previous mistake, and accepted Reason over Superstition.”

Conservative atheist Allahpundit scoffs:

Hey, remember when one of the benefits of not following a religion was being spared that religion’s rituals? What’s next, Sunday atheist mass?

The "rituals" are more satire and political demonstration than anything. The mockery of religious sacraments reminds me of PZ Meyers desecration of the Eucharist awhile back, but this is a little more complex:

Some of the so-called "de-baptized" have used their certificates to petition churches to remove their names from baptismal rolls. One argument: they were baptized without their consent as children and should now be declared de-baptized. Some churches, however, aren't budging on what they regard as an irreversible sacrament.

I can understand why some atheists would find this cathartic.

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