Babak Sarfaraz writes:

Unlike their wide-eyed parents with their utopias and romanticization of revolutionary  violence, the new young revolutionaries are sophisticated and canny. They have few 6-26-new-revolutionaries illusions about the magnitude of the problems facing their country or the complexities of  living in a highly traditional and religious society. For example, despite the fact that they are overwhelmingly secular, their slogans mingle political and religious themes to avoid alienating the faithful. Their response to Obama’s initially measured rhetoric is another sign of a new political sophistication at work: everyone understands that US meddling would be the proverbial kiss of death to the opposition’s cause.

In the days and weeks to come, this infant movement will face difficult challenges. It may suffer some setbacks and reversals, but what matters is the experience it has gained. At this stage, it is doubtful that fear alone can contain the rising tide of discontent or return things to the status quo ante.

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