I know some liberals will object, but the inclusion in a same-sex marriage bill of an explicit exception for religious organizations seems to me to be a powerful combination, which both assures civil equality and religious freedom, which seems to be the main fear of those who oppose equality. I notice too that a poll just taken in California comes to the same conclusion:

When asked, 'Do you strongly favor, somewhat favor, somewhat oppose, or strongly oppose allowing same-sex couples to be legally married,' 47% say favor and 48% say oppose. Support for any given ballot measure will depend on the specific language of that measure. For example, results show that support increases if the language specifically includes a provision that says no clergy will be required to perform a service that goes against their faith.


I propose that any initiative wording in a future California ballot specifically include a religious exemption. It shows we are serious about religious freedom and a church-state divide.

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