Vaughan has a thoughtful post on drugs:

As we have reported several times in the past, the UK has a regular public ritual where the government commissions a panel of scientists to report on the health dangers of drugs, and then completely ignores them when they point out that the current policies make no sense and don't reflect the actual impact of the substances.This week's Bad Science column has another example, where a now leaked 1991 World Health Organisation report [pdf] on the impact of cocaine was suppressed by the US government because it pointed out that it's not as intrinsically poisonous to health or society as it's made out by drug war propaganda.
This political double book-keeping is probably why the severity of drug laws around the world have virtually no relation to the drug use of the population. I'm morbidly curious about how we've arrived at this odd situation where one of the culturally universal human activities, modifying our consciousness with drugs, must be looked down on publicly to the point where our politicians are free to ignore evidence when it suits them.

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