Peter Feaver considers it:

Many people have observed that President Bush should have developed a more comfortable language of apology and sooner. I agree. But on key occasions when Bush did follow the "admit mistakes" playbook, he ran into a problem...apologizing lances the boil (that is good) but, to mix a metaphor, it locks in amber a distorted view of what happened (that is bad), and over time leaves the president unable to defend himself against unfair attacks on that subject.

Susan Wise Bauer's under-rated book from last year, The Art of the Public Grovel, explains how politicians survive or flail during scandals, primarily scandals of a sexual nature. Her book describes how various politicians have salvaged their careers and restored public trust through an almost ritualistic admission of wrongdoing and sin ┬ľor failed miserably. Interview with Bauer here.

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