A reader writes:

I am about to go vote at the Iranian embassy in London. Friends who went in the morning have waited 3 hours and a half to cast their vote.  I am also in touch with my sister and my friends in Iran  GREENREVMajid:Getty via Facebook and Yahoo messenger, and it makes me feel a bit sad not to be in Iran at this moment. Almost all my friend have voted for Mousavi (and some for Karroubi) proudly announcing it on Facebook. The emotion in the messages runs so high it is almost contagious. I refresh my facebook page every minute, and with it I read link after link of news on the election: reports, fears, and conspiracy theories about voting irregularities;  inspirational status messages; some boycotters announcing they have caved in and are going to cast a vote, some proudly standing firm; some posting overly emotional notes which I have a feeling are going to be embarrassed about a little bit later on.

Oh, I just got another status update from my sister: make sure you use your own pens at the voting booths! (apparently there are pens with easily erasable ink).

It would be heartbreaking to see all this emotion and commitment crushed by vote rigging. Let's hope the margins of victory are beyond that.

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