Iran-inside-out

Even as the flow of footage, tweets, and reporting from Iran has started to ebb, the Dish wants to keep the spotlight on the Iranian people as much as possible in the coming weeks. So while continuing to post fresh political content, we want to start featuring as much cultural content as we can find - particularly as seen through the eyes of young Iranian bloggers. The more Americans get to know Iran's rapidly-ascending millennials, the greater chance there is for melting stereotypes and finding commonalities, however incremental. In his latest column, Roger Cohen touched upon the impact such online foreign exchange could have:

One benefit of the massive show of resistance to a stolen vote, and future, has been to awaken Americans to the civic vitality of Iranian society a real country with real people rather than a bunch of zealous clerics posing a nuclear problem. This is a sea change. Iran has been denuclearized, not in the sense that the problem has gone away (on the contrary), but in the sense that a rounded picture, beyond to bomb or not to bomb, has formed.

So, as with everything we do at the Dish, we need your help. Please email andrew@theatlantic.com with links to exceptional Iranian blogs, viral videos, music videos, short films, photo gallerys, art pieces, poetry, quotable fiction, or anything else you think contributes to the cultural milieu of young Iranians.  (Special emphasis on cross-pollinated content between Iranians and Americans, Europeans, or Israelis.)

(Photo by Leila Taghinia, one of 56 contemporary Iranian artists currently featured at the Chelsea Museum's Iran Inside Out - "the largest exhibition of its kind ever to be shown in New York."  It runs through September 5th. Full details here.)

-- CB

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