FISTOlivierLaban-Mattei:AFP:Getty

From the indispensable Laura Rozen:

"The disapointment and disorientation of people in Iran that I've spoken to is unmistakable," said Parsi, of the National Iranian American Council. "While a majority argue that this is a coup by Ahmadinejad and Khamenei agaisnt virtually the rest of the establishment, there are several question marks: Khamenei, most experts agree, is addicted to the perception of legitinacy for himself and the system. But this coup does away with any chances for such legitimacy. Indeed, it is difficult to see why he would view this situation as terribly favorable.

"Which then raises the question," Parsi continued, "as to whether a reassessment is needed of the assumption that Khamenei enjoys the position of strength that so often is ascribed to him. If this is not a favorable situation, why is he going along with it? Is he too under pressure from circles in the Guard?"

(Photo: A supporter of defeated Iranian presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi shouts slogans during riots in Tehran on June 13, 2009. By Olivier Laban-Mattei/AFP/Getty.)

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