Ambers thinks Mitt's fortunes are rising:

Romney is picking and choosing his battles. He shares an Obama-esque disdain for the superficial daily scrum that cable channels whip up. It's a credit to his communications team that he can appear on television once every two or three weeks and seem to be part of the dialog. When Romney has something to say, he'll find a venue to say it.  On auto restructuring, on the Republican stimulus plan, on a free market approach to health care, on the Employee Free Choice Act, and on missile defense, Romney matches his opinions to key constituencies, and he always draws respectful news coverage.  What's Romney saying about Mark Sanford? Nothing.

I think Romney's a hologram of pure cynicism and borderline nuts. Remember that convention speech? One pandering vacuity after another. And he must know he will never be his party's pick, because the very people he panders to are the very bigots who would never vote for him.

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