Another first-hand report via John O'Sullivan:

4.20 pm. A short figured girl who was walking next to me reached in her purse took out a green wristband and then raised her hands up in the air with a Victory sign. We all followed and the crowed automatically became a quiet and defiant freedom seeker band; “be tarafe azadi..” (towards Freedom) Hooman said aloud in a muffled bass voice. Azadi means freedom in Persian so towards Azadi can mean either going towards Azadi square or going towards freedom. His voice was horse from nights of chanting “Allah Akbar” on the rooftops.

The guards had all things planned and they stopped us in front of the Dampezeshki University (Veterinary University). They actually blocked us from the front, back and from the streets. So we pushed ourselves into the street and then the war started.

The evil guards charged towards us and scream replaced the victory signs. Jaleh, Hooman and I held each others hands as the wild dogs attacked and the people scrambled and fell over each other. Within seconds they reached us and they were swiping people up their feet with clubs, chains, and some innovative black rubber piece (that looked like a short water hose). We hid behind Hooman but he was hit on the leg and fell on top of us, Jaleh was hit on her face and I fell on my right ankle. Screams and yells were everywhere and we were at first very scared but it seems that the fear disappears after the first hit. People started chanting “Natarsim, natarsim maa hame ba ham hastim” (we are not afraid cause we are united).

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