MILLENNIALSOlivieLaban-Mattei:AFP:Getty

This blog has long been interested in Iran, especially in its younger generation so open to the West. Part of it is that I've long believed that Iran was much more likely to become a democracy than its neighboring Arab states - and that this might be the key to unwinding the clash of civilizations that was hurtling us toward apocalyptic scenarios. Part of it is that being immersed in online media, I'm perhaps more aware of the vibrant debate, evolving culture and amazing passion of Iran's Millennials. So this day is a moment of great hope and joy for those of us who have been waiting for it and knowing that one day, it would come. But many Americans have, sadly, been left unaware of this phenomenon - and a glance at the cable news of the weekend helps explain why. Maybe these images will change that. A reader writes:

I am 31 years old.  I cannot remember ever having a discussion about "Iran" at work.  I cannot remember ever having a discussion about "Iran" with my wife or members of my family.  Unless it was about their nuclear weapons program, or their involvement in Iraq, I cannot remember ever having a conversation about "Iran" with any of my friends.

Today, people at work are sharing photos, many of them are those found on the links you have provided.  People are speaking about "Iran", not as an enemy - but as a people who has had their freedom taken from them. I don't know how this will resolve, but those protesters need to know they are not alone.

They aren't. If you can read this out there, know that we are with you, every day and every moment of your fight for your freedoms. And know this too:

Yes You Can.

(Photo: Supporters of  Iranian president-elect Mir Hossein Mousavi stand at the gate of their university campus during a rally in Tehran on June 15, 2009. By Olivier Laban-Mattei/Getty.)

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