Publius gets to the heart of one of my worries about the Waxman bill:

I think the bill will get better in time, not worse.  One strong objection I’ve heard from the left is that Waxman-Markey would be counterproductive because it would suck the wind of out of “real” reform efforts.  In other words, the bill would be a false comfort. Perhaps.  But my hope is that the politics on this issue is getting better, not worse.  In the years to come, one hopes that more and more Americans come around on issues like food policy and climate change.  And I’m also hopeful that we’ll see “greener” politicians on all levels of government.  Having this initial regulatory framework in place will make future grassroots efforts more efficient and effective – one hopes.

I want to agree with this, but I have this nagging feeling that half-measures that are sold as panaceas will make it harder to propose new half-measures. At the same time, I don't see getting a better bill anytime soon given the political constraints.

--PA

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