Another Honduran blogger, a lay volunteer with the Catholic diocese of Santa Rosa de Copán in Honduras, describes the situation on the ground:

The campaign for the poll was full of all sorts of corrupt practices – people being paid to sign petitions, public workers being forced to get petitions signed. The Zelaya’s administration has been very corrupt. There are concerns about what he would do if he were returned, since both the legislative and judicial branches of the government were involved in the coup.

From an earlier post:

I fear we have gone from bad to worse. At least Zelaya seemed to speak out for the poor. As one priest said this morning, despite all his errors and his vanity, Zelaya was the first major leader in many years to offer people a little bit of openness to the needs of the poor. The priest said he is not supporting the person Zelaya, but the cause of the poor. Micheletti is closely tied with the economic powers to be. An indication of his position is his support of privatization of water in his own district.

If readers know of other Honduran bloggers, please send links.


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