Kristof gets an account from an American journalist who describes how his translator was beaten by government forces. Kristof then reflects:

The Iranian people have been seething for more than half a century at the way the United States organized a coup in 1953 to block the democratic will of the people. It’ll be interesting to see if anger at the regime for apparently blocking the democratic will of the people has as big a legacy.

In my experience, when regimes have to go after citizens with truncheons and belt buckles, it’s usually a pretty good sign that they do so because they can’t succeed any other way; it’s a reflection that they have no legitimacy left.

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