One might imagine that a brief reading of the Gospels would lead to an understanding that we should not, as Christians, abhor whole groups of people, or treat them as anathema, or regard their difference as a threat. In fact, a brief perusal might lead one to believe that Jesus emphatically saw this embrace of the other as a core value. And then we have the kind of Christianity that is more supportive of torture than atheism and can say something like this:

People don't understand the dictionaryit's called queer. Queer means strange and unusual. It's not like a slur, like you would call a white person a honky or something like that. You know, God is pretty explicit in what we're supposed to dowhat man and woman are for. Now, at the same time, we're supposed to love everybody and accept people, and preach against the sins. I've had some friends that are actually homosexual. And, I mean, they know where I stand, and they know that I wouldn't have them anywhere near my children. But at the same time, they're people, and they're going to do their thing.

Sam Wurzelbacher has every right to keep his children away from anyone. But he is instilling bigotry at an early age. As is his party.

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