Megan isn't so sure about the green shoots:

I don't want to push the Great Depression analogy too far, but what's surprising when you go back to primary sources from 1930 is the optimism.  I don't mean to imply that everyone thinks things are just swell.  But while you know that they are facing the worst economic decade of the twentieth century, they don't.  They're expecting something more like the recession that followed World War I.  People are cutting back, but they're still spending, particularly because companies are slashing prices to move inventory.  It was the long grind of the years that followed, and the catastrophe of the second banking crisis, that scarred them permanently.  And this shows up in the economics stats and the stock market, which did not, as we like to imagine, simply decline in a straight line.

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