by Patrick Appel

The Obama administration has decided to accept an appeals-court ruling that could undermine DADT - at least eventually. Marc thinks through on Obama's DADT strategy:

Obama will probably convene a commission -- not sure yet whether it'll be a blue ribbon dealy or a smaller task force -- that will,  under the guise of studying the "problem," be tasked with coming up with ways to meaningfully and safely integrate open homosexuality with military service. No mistake here: the administration will not give this commission the option to decide that being gay is not compatible with service.  But the idea is to build a consensus through all available means -- legally, through the courts, in public, through a concerted but non-hectoring public relations effort, in the military, by conveying the sense that Obama takes the objections to his view seriously -- and then, when such a consensus has arisen, work with Congress to change the policy.

But why the delay on setting up a commission to delay the decision on DADT? Support for gays serving openly is already overwhelming among the public. A three-fourths majority seems like a consensus to me. Andrew's take on Obama's dithering here. Clip above from Maddow's show last night.

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