"The recent release of the unredacted OLC memos has opened many eyes, mine included. The legal “analysis” in the redacted memoranda earlier released did not give graphic detail of the techniques. As a then-law school dean in Washington, DC, I became privy to Bush White House briefings encouraging all those in attendance to defend the president in public commentary. Trustingly, I did, but now greatly resent that the most pertinent details were withheld. Reading my own commentary leaves me grievously embarrassed in light of the recent disclosures. I find what I was told and then repeated absurdly indefensible. Mea culpa...

In the 1950s the great French Thomist philosopher Jacques Maritain ... wrote: 

“I do not say that [Americans] always act according to the dictates of conscience–what nation does? I say that they feel miserable, they endure terrible discomfort when they have a guilty conscience. The very fact alone of nursing a doubt as to whether their conduct was or was not ethically irreproachable causes them pain. The result is sometimes unexpected, as the wave of fondness for the Japanese people which developed after Hiroshima. Let us say that hiring the devil for help will never be agreeable even to [American] politicians.” 

Well, at least not acceptable to the American people.  We now know the devil is in the details," - Doug Kmiec.

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