by Patrick Appel

Ezra Klein looks at the Republican health care alternative:

...though it's still too early to say how the policy fits together, it's clear that many traditionally Democratic concepts have been embraced. To put it simply, the plan wants to encourage a version of the Massachusetts reforms -- which it calls a "well-known, bi-partisan achievement of universal health care" -- in every state. There are some differences, of course. The plan doesn't have an individual mandate. It doesn't have an obvious tax on employers. But it strongly endorses State Health Insurance Exchanges. And that, for Republicans, is a radical change in policy.


Karen Tumulty has more.

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