This is unfinished business - a news event that got swallowed up by the release of the ICRC report, the OLC Memos and the Senate Armed Services report. But given this blog's coverage of governor Palin's various strange stories about Trig, and her continued refusal to provide any medical records to confirm her account, her speech to the Kansas Right To Life organization - her first public explanation for her unusual behavior, since the MSM decided it was a question that could not be asked - is worth entering into the public record. 

She explains above what she describes as her "fleeting moment" of temptation to abort Trig when she found out she was pregnant at an out of state energy conference, and her decision to keep the pregnancy secret for seven months (an endeavor made easier by the fact that no one seeing her had any idea up to the very day she announced). I tend to assume that everything Palin says is untrue until proven otherwise, and in this case, have no basis to confirm or deny anything. But it is also only fair to give her own explanation for her secrecy an airing.

For the record, she says that she kept her pregnancy secret for seven months because there were "neanderthals" out there who would have refused to believe that a pregnant woman could handle her public duties as governor, and because of her own conflicted feelings about having a Down Syndrome child at the age of 44. She does not explain the bizarre circumstances of the day-long labor on various airplanes. But, hey, maybe at some point, she will. When she does, I will do my best to bring it to you. Maybe one day - who knows? - a journalist might even ask.

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