Those of us who held out hope that the Obama administration would not be actively covering up the brutal torture of a Gitmo prisoner who was subject to abuse in several countries must now concede the obvious. They're covering it up - in such a crude and obvious fashion that it is actually a crime in Britain. I have little to add to what Glenn Greenwald writes here. On all the core points, he's plainly correct and those of us who have tried to give Obama the benefit of the doubt must concede that there is no longer any benefit or any doubt. As to why, I suspected it might be to avoid inflaming Pakistan still further. Glenn pushes back:

(a) it's possible (actually, quite easy) to detail what was done to Mohamed without disclosing in which foreign government's custody he was when it happened; (b) why would evidence of the Musharraf government's torture of Mohamed harm the current Pakistani government?; and, most of all, (c) it's already public knowledge that Mohamed was seized, detained and abused in Pakistan (see paragraphs 59-68 of Mohamed's complaint against Jeppesen, entitled "Detention, Interrogation and Torture in Pakistan").

It increasingly looks as if Brown and Obama simply cannot face the consequences of revealing to the world the full facts of a brutal torture conducted at the behest of and possibly at the hands of the two alleged paragons of human rights in the world, the UK and the US.

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