Radley Balko considers the case of a family on the lam after a judge ruled that they have to give their 13-year-old with cancer chemo despite their religious objections, and compares it to Tim Pawlenty vetoing a bill that would have allowed patients to use pot to alleviate pain in their final days:

[P]olicies governing how and when we give sick people access to the medication that could mitigate their pain, ameliorate the side effects of their treatment, or even save their lives, aren't based on compassion, individual rights, or even an honest assessment of science and risk. Instead, we have a patchwork of laws and enforcement policies driven by decades-old drug war hysteria, pharmaceutical paranoia, irrational aversion to risk, bureaucratic turf wars, and, of course, politics.

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