Julian Sanchez responds to Andrew Stuttaford's post on children of non-believers turning to religion:

...a secularist who wants to ensure his kids aren’t easy prey for nutty doctrines has an alternative to inoculating them with some gelded lo-carb form of faith. Instead, he can try to supply them with the array of tools needed to satisfy the needs religion answers, to interpret the experiences religion purports to explain, and to grapple with the questions to which religion promises pat answers.

Inevitably, a thoughtful and independent child will reject some of the parent’s preferred tools and lenses. But they’ll probably end up looking for ways to improve or replace those particular tools and lenses, not for the wonder tonic that does it all. They’ll have the same holes in their hearts we all do from time to time, but less use for the blunt God-shaped plug we carve when we’re trying to fill them all at the same time.

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