DiA has questions about the Pentagon's fishy denial:

Could it be a non-denial denial on the part of the Pentagon? "None of the photos in question depict the images that are described in that article," says Bryan Whitman, a deputy assistant secretary of defence. Are "the photos in question" different from the ones the press are referring to? If so, it seems a bit beside the point.


A reader also reminds me of what Lindsey Graham said five years ago:

"Graham, speaking after Rumsfeld's Senate testimony, suggested that material in at least one tape held by Defense Department investigators could be by far the most-damaging yet to the U.S. military effort in Iraq and its prestige around the world. "The American public needs to understand, we're talking about rape and murder here. We're not just talking about giving people a humiliating experience. We're talking about rape and murder and some very serious charges,'' Graham said to reporters.

It's remarkable how soon they forget. Bush's refusal to accept Rumsfeld's resignation on the spot may have been one of the worst decisions of his presidency (although there's some competition).

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