Dreher interviews Maggie Gallagher. After dismissing the big increase in public support for civil unions and marriage equality over the last decade, she insists:

Public opinion hasn't changed much at all. What's changed is the punishment the gay marriage movement is inflicting on dissenters, which is narrowing the circle of people willing to speak.

This is a very powerful movement, no question. Nobody understands that better than I do.

But in the end--and this is not necessarily "optimistic" -I think civilizations that can't hang onto an idea as basic as to make a marriage you need a husband and a wife aren't going to make it in the long haul.

So I'm not worried about the progressive myth that 200 years from now gay marriage will be the new world norm. I'm somewhat more worried about the kind of cultures around the world that might survive. It's not clear to me they'll have the virtues of American civilization for gay people or anyone else.

(Apologies for the messed up block-quote. Typepad strikes again. They really do make it much, much harder to blog.)

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.