Some more from Wiki on the charges that Alexander Scotland tortured prisoners under his care in London. It seems pertinent to me that the allegations of abuse and torture were reported in 1943 by the head of MI5:

In September 1940, Guy Liddell, director of MI5's counterintelligence B Division, said that he had been told by an officer present at the interrogation that Scotland had punched the jaw of a Alexander_scotland captured German agent at the London Cage. The agent was Wulf Schmidt, known by the code name "Tate." Liddell said in a diary entry that Scotland was "hitting TATE in the jaw and I think got one back himself." Liddell said: "Apart from the moral aspects of the thing, I am convinced that these Gestapo methods do not pay in the long run." Liddell said that "Scotland turned up this morning with a syringe containing some drug or other, which it was thought would induce the prisoner [Tate] to speak." [33][34][35] Schmidt subsequently became a double agent against the Germans as part of the Double Cross System of double agents operated by MI5.[35]
In 1943, allegations of mistreatment at the London Cage resulted in a formal protest to the Secretary of State for War by MI5 director Maxwell Knight. [33] The allegations were made by Otto Witt, a German anti-Nazi who was interrogated to determine if he was acting on behalf of German intelligence.

When the head of MI5 is demanding the disciplining of Scotland, and insisting that torture doesn't work, we are in a very different situation than one in which the president himself has approved of torture in classified memos and the CIA director is insisting that the methods did in fact work and should remain as part of an official program of interrogation.

(Photo: Alexander Scotland.)

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